a Bit of a Rant about Self-Publishing

If you’re reading this then you’re almost certainly a reader and you might even classify yourself as a writer. I’ve written lots in this blog about the process of writing and my own personal experience. It’s been a while since I had a proper rant about self-publishing so I’m going to indulge myself. It’s Christmas, after all. Or it was not so many weeks ago.

There are lots of books out there. Millions and millions of them. Not many of them are worth reading, even so there’s not enough time to read all the good ones. What I’d like to see is a better way of getting through all the dross to find books that are worth my valuable time to read.

We all know that everyone can self-publish at the click of a mouse. This doesn’t mean that everyone should. Quite the reverse. This wonderful opportunity should surely be used with discretion. Self-restraint should be the order of the day but I’ve seen very little of that recently.

I estimate that there are about three million self-published titles. I doubt that one per cent of these are readable. That leaves three hundred thousand that have been reasonably well written and professionally edited. My bet is that one per cent of these, three thousand, are books that I would find enjoyable. Problem is, how do I find them?

About half a million titles per year get traditionally published in the UK and US combined. One of the features of traditional publishing is that they sell books like vegetables. Once they’ve had a couple of months in the shop window, they get replaced by new fresh produce. This is in sharp contrast to the self-published market where it’s very rare indeed for an author to unpublish their beloved opus.

Traditionally published titles have a greater chance of being good books, properly produced and generally readable. Let’s assume that a whopping ten per cent would interest me. That’s fifty thousand books a year, about a thousand times the number I read.

So, for me, the statistics, even though I’m making them up as I go along, are compelling. I don’t have the time to search amongst all the dross for that rare self-published gem. My chances of a good read are greatly enhanced by sticking to the traditional offerings. For this reason, I have never bought a self-published book. Occasionally, I might have a ‘look inside’ but this generally only serves to confirm their appalling lack of quality.

What’s the answer? How can self-publishing be improved to overcome the reluctant buyer like me?

For a start, writers can stop publishing crap. That would even the odds a little. Completing a first novel is a wonderful thing and something to be proud of. Self-publishing it is almost always a big mistake. Very few of us are able to produce work of merchantable quality first time round. Conventional wisdom suggests that a writer needs about a million words of practice. That’s the equivalent of ten full length novels. Ten. No matter how special a talent you might be, you’re going to need lots of practice and tuition.

Writers can get valuable encouragement and learn their trade by joining a writers’ circle and attending writing courses.

Once a writer has produced a good chunk of work, there are useful books on craft that may be helpful. You may even be lucky enough to find someone to read your work who doesn’t care about your feelings.

It’s a good sign when a writer stops being precious and protective about their work. I’m afraid that most writers never progress to this important stage which is necessary in order to work constructively with an editor. Every writer needs a professional and talented editor.

There you go, rant over for the time being.

photo credit: _Hadock_ Study Time via photopin (license)

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